Monday, July 10, 2017

Unconditional Faith

We will all talk about unconditional love, because it is something we all want to experience. But what about faith?

In the two readings today we get two approaches to faith: Jacob and the official whose daughter has died.

Jacob is the example of how we often approach faith.

If God remains with me, to protect me on this journey I am making and to give me enough bread to eat and clothing to wear, and I come back safe to my father’s house, the LORD shall be my God.

We make promises about what we will do at some point in the future, if God first does what we want. It is the classical conditional sentence: if this, then that. Jacob wants to play Let's Make a Deal..

Contrast that with the official in the gospel.

My daughter has just died. But come, lay your hand on her, and she will live.

The official does not promise to believe in Jesus if he heals his daughter. He expresses with certainty his belief that when Jesus lays his hand on her she will live.

The woman with the hemorrhage has the same certain. She say "if" but she is not making deal she is stating a fact. She says it in the same way I might say, "If I am up at 5 A.M. I will see the sunrise."

On a daily basis we must choose which kind of faith we are going to have the conditional faith of Jacob or the unconditional faith in the gospel. The psalm response for the day tells which one we should choose,

In you, my God, I place my trust.

This is the one we should chose. It's up to us each day which one we will chose..

Saturday, July 8, 2017

God's Justice

Today's first reading is one of the more problematic in the Bible. Jacob lies to his dying father, steals his brother's inheritance and ends up with God's blessing. My guess is that something inside everyone of us says that it's not fair. A liar and a thief should be punished, not blessed.

The problem is the shortness of our vision. We see the world one action at a time. We may if we are wise be able to develop a slightly larger perspective but we will never have the perspective of God who sees all time and space simultaneously and therefore can see what we cannot. He sees how all of it, everything that ever was, is or will be, fits together into a cohesive whole.

This in no way means that the sin is not sin. A lie is a lie and theft is theft. But only God can truly know how justice is best applied. For our part we have to trust God. And trusting God does not mean angrily thinking inside, "God will get them eventually."

Imagine for a moment if we took every single moment that we have spent judging the actions of another, and focused that same energy on conforming our own words and actions to God's will. Imagine how much holier each of us would be.





Thursday, July 6, 2017

Our problem with authority

In today's gospel we find one of the passages that points to the two sacraments we associate with healing: anointing of the sick and penance. Like other healing stories, we can read this story of the paralytic from Mt. 9 and we can miss the deeper meaning. It is captured in the reaction of the crowd.

When the crowds saw this they were struck with awe and glorified God who had given such authority to men.

This story is not simply about the power to heal. It is about authority. Further it is not simply about the authority of Jesus but about the sharing of that authority with the Church. The crowd does not marvel at the authority given to a man; they marvel at the authority given to men, plural (anthropois).

And here is where we start to react. We don't mind the idea of answering to God or Jesus, but we begin to react negatively to the idea that we are suppose to be obedient to the authority of people, and for some there is a particular distaste of the idea of answering to men.

If we look closely at our reaction what we see is fear. We are afraid the a human being with authority will abuse it and we or someone we love will get hurt. It has happened. It has happened in the church. And it continues to happen. Power and authority are seductive things.

So why should we trust, because we trust God. We cannot claim to be people of faith, if we do not trust God. And a part of trusting God, is trusting that God knew what He was doing when he created the Church.

you are Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church, and the gates of the netherworld shall not prevail against it.

Today's first reading is the sacrifice of Issac, the story of absolute trust in God. Abraham trusted God so completely that he was willing to sacrifice his own son, if it had been God's will.

We can trust and not fear because we know that ultimately God protects the Church the way God protected Issac. Even if this or that individual makes a wrong decision or abuses their authority and we are hurt, we know that ultimately God has the power to transform that pain or suffering into a source of grace and strength. We do not need to ever be afraid.

When the crowds saw this they were struck with awe and glorified God who had given such authority to men

May we look upon all of God's creation with the same sense of awe, including the Church.

Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Our truest self

Each year on the Fourth of July I am reminded how blessed I am to live in Virginia where so much of our nations history is within easy driving distance. It is important for each of us to remember the ideals on which our nation was founded.

The right likes to scream about the liberal media bias and the left likes to scream about the president. But behind both problems is a deeper issue.

As Christians we believe that human beings were and are created in the image of God and are therefore good. We simultaneously believe that everyone of us on this earth today suffers the stain of original sin.

St. Paul articulated the struggle best in his Letter to the Romans when he wrote,

I do not do the good I want, but I do the evil I do not want.

We strive to do the good, even though we fail on a regular basis, because we know that the good is what we were created to be and what we are called to be. Or at least we used to know this.

Sunday in response to one of the president's tweets, a spokesperson applauded him for being "genuine." I found the defense more disturbing than the tweet because it reflected a deeper more recent cultural turn that has largely happened in my lifetime.

When I was growing up we were taught that a part of maturation was impulse control and learning how to behave in civilized society. In the 60's impulse control was labeled repression, and good manners was relegated to the land of snobs. To be authentic meant letting your most basic impulses out in public -the stereotype of the hippie. Now this attitude is being embraced by both left and right.

As Christians we believe that doing good is as genuinely human as doing evil. In fact we are more human when we chose the good. As Christians we can distinguish between suppression and repression. Suppression is a good thing. It is the result of a choice we make. We have the bad thought and we chose not to give voice to it or to act on it.

Acting contrary to our impulses is not hypocrisy, it is how we grow. In the words of C.S. Lewis, "Do not waste time bothering whether you ‘love’ your neighbor; act as if you did. As soon as we do this we find one of the great secrets. When you are behaving as if you loved someone, you will presently come to love him.”

Some will call the founding fathers hypocrites because they did not live the values they professed. They were not hypocrites but people knew their flaws but also knew that we are called to be better, called to be more.

On this Fourth of July, let us pray that we never settle for who we are today. Let us keep the ideal ever before us. There was since the fall only one who was authentic — the one who was true God and true man, Jesus Christ. If we want to be authentic, we imitate him.










Monday, July 3, 2017

My Lord and my God

Today the Church celebrates the Feast of St. Thomas the Apostle. At the end of the gospel we hear the very simple profession of faith exclaimed by St. Thomas, "My Lord and My God." Five simple words.

But how willing are we really to embrace the implications of those five words. For most of us the first two may be the most problematic, My Lord. If he is the Lord then I am the servant. That means from the time I wake up until the time I fall asleep my primary concern is being there to do whatever he want. I may on occasion be about my own business but must be ready, when called, to drop what I'm doing and run to do whatever he wants me to do. His words are not polite suggestions for what I might want to do; they are orders. We may have loved watching Downton Abbey, but which of us would really want to be "in service." Any yet, as Christians we are called to be like those characters who spent their entire lives as servants.

The Second half, My God, is not much easier. To say he is my God means that I worship him. I'm not even sure if we know what it means to worship. More and more our so-called worship on Sunday is expected to be fun and entertaining, especially for the children. The idea that we go to church to worship God seems to have vanished. The mountain of material written today on meditation has mostly dropped references to the one that should be the object of our meditation, God.



Sunday, July 2, 2017

Lord I am not worthy

Every time we are at mass, before we go forward to receive communion, we quote the centurion,

Lord I am not worthy that you should enter under my roof...

But how much do we really believe in our unworthiness.

Those of us who are older love to complain about the millennials and their belief that they are all beautiful unique little snowflakes. We forget that they did not invent the notion, they got it from the generations before them.

In the Catholic Church we have our own snowflakes. You can spot them by their mantra, "How dare some priest tell me I shouldn't go to communion?" The concept of unworthiness, or unworthy reception of a sacrament is unimaginable. The sad thing is that much of h time they are completely unaware of the hubris that their attitude represents.

In today's gospel Jesus raises the bar to, what seems to be, an impossible level.

Whoever loves father or mother more than me is not worthy of me,
and whoever loves son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me;
and whoever does not take up his cross and follow after me
is not worthy of me.


We need to keep in mind that Greek has a variety of words for love. The verb used in Matthew's gospel for love is phileo. Jesus is making it clear that if we hope to be worthy to enter the kingdom of heaven we must strive for a higher form of love, a love not bound to human relationships, agape.

The problem is that we cannot achieve this love on our own. It is only with the assistance of God's grace that we can even hope to move from phileo to agapeo. And Jesus in the statement above provides at least one clear indicator of the presence of agape, the willingness to take up the cross and carry it. To be worthy of Jesus, to be worthy of the kingdom we must posses the supernatural love that is willing to suffer and sacrifice not simply for loved ones but for others, strangers, people we might tend to judge.

How do we get there? The initial movement is always God's. God calls us, God offers the grace to us, but we have to respond. We must allow our merely human love to be transformed, and that transformed love must bear fruit in our everyday words and actions. Or else, we are not worthy of Jesus or his kingdom.

Thankfully, when we fall into a truly unworthy state we have the sacrament of penance/reconciliation to bring us back, to heal our wounded relationship with God.

In the opening prayer for today's mass, we asked:

that we may not be wrapped in the darkness of error
but always be seen to stand in the bright light of truth.

May we have courage to stand in the bright light of truth about our own lives, and so by God's grace be made worthy to be called disciples of the one Lord Jesus Christ.

Saturday, July 1, 2017

The strange favor

In today's first reading we get what has to be the strangest request for a favor. Not only is it strange but I don't know that I have ever heard it repeated.

Abraham sees three strangers walking down the road. And, as chapter 18 of Genesis reports it, he runs out and asks them to do him a favor.

Sir, if I may ask you this favor, please do not go on past your servant. Let some water be brought, that you may bathe your feet, and then rest yourselves under the tree. Now that you have come this close to your servant, let me bring you a little food, that you may refresh yourselves; and afterward you may go on your way.

So they are doing him a favor by bathing with his water, resting in his home, and eating his food?

And the answer is Yes! He is not doing them a favor by offering hospitality. They are doing him the favor by accepting it. To us this all seems backwards. It is another example of how God's ways are not our ways.

Of all the virtues in the Bible hospitality is the one that seems to get the most lost. And yet, the concept that is central to the Old Testament is really the foundation for evangelization in the New Testament. It is not enough to open the doors to those who come looking. Like Abraham, we must go out in the street and beg them to come visit. The passage tells us that Abraham "ran from the entrance of the tent to greet them; and bowing to the ground..." Imagine any one us, bowing to the ground and begging." We're Americans. Some of us don't even want to kneel before God in church. And we certainly do not beg anyone for anything.

And yet, if we are good Jews or Christians, the scriptures tell us that we must. The scriptures are clear that one of the measures by which we are ultimately judged is how we treat the stranger, the foreigner, the person.from whom we can expect no recompense. And all the excuses in the world cannot save us when we stand before God. We are the most blessed county in the world, and therefore God can rightly demand the most from us. When we are personally inhospitable, we call down judgement on us. When we support inhospitable policy, we call down judgement upon us. And when we stand before God which of us will have the nerve to hide behind the non-biblical adage, "Charity begins at home" - words never uttered by a person who is actually charitable.




Monday, June 26, 2017

Unconditional Surrender

If we ask where the story begins, we could go back to creation as the book of Genesis does, or we could go back to before time and space as John's gospel does. But today's first reading is the other important beginning, the beginning of the People of Israel, the beginning of the first covenant.

As chapter 12 of Genesis recounts the story it begins with a call — a call and a promise. Actually it begins with a command.

Go forth halak in Hebrew. The verb means simply to walk. In this case Abram is commanded to walk away from everything he knows. God promises great blessings if he can do this one simple thing.

I will make of you a great nation, and I will bless you; I will make your name great, so that you will be a blessing. I will bless those who bless you and curse those who curse you. All the communities of the earth shall find blessing in you.

But it is not simple. God does not tell him where they are going. He is told only that he is to leave him home and go to "the land I will show you."

We call Abraham "our father in faith" and today's reading tells us why. Because the response of Abram is not given in words it is given in action. In Hebrew it is the past tense of the same verb God used in the command. God commanded him to walk and the response is Abram walked. He just gets up and walks away — from the known to the unknown.

This unnegotiated, unconditional trust in God is the beginning of the covenant that God will make with the people of Israel. When God makes the new and eternal covenant it will be Mary who says the unconditional yes to God's will.

Abram and Mary are the two models of perfect faith.

In yesterday's gospel we were told to not be afraid. Today and every day we can lead fearless lives if we start each day trying to imitate the faith of Abram and Mary.




Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Sanctity and Youth

In our English documents we tend to call today's saint St. Anthony of Padua. Ask the Portuguese and they will tell you he is St. Anthony of Lisbon for the place where he was born.

Regardless of moniker, what remains to me most striking about this saint is how powerfully God's grace worked in him at such a young age. We tend to think of saints as wise and old, as if those two things go together. St. Anthony was only 36 when he died. And yet, he was such a gifted preacher than he made it all the way to the court of the Pope and after his death was named a Doctor of the Church, a title reserved for the greatest teachers of the faith.

What he accomplished in his short life was clearly not his work, but the work of God in and though him. For any of us who preach or teach the faith today is a day not only to look to the example of St. Anthony but also we should not be afraid to ask for his help. Now, as much as ever, we need the ability to translate the message of the gospel into words that can be understood by the world in which we live, especially a language that can be heard by our youth and young adults.

St. Anthony, pray for us.



Monday, June 12, 2017

Compassion and Encouragement

Today we begin a two week reading of the Second Letter of St. Paul to the Church in Corinth. He opens his letter describing God not only of the Father of Jesus but as

the Father of compassion and God of encouragement.

The first of the words is similar to the word we use when we sing Kyrie, Eleison (Lord, have mercy). Many linguists will point out that the word St. Paul uses hear is less removed; it represents a deeply felt kind of compassion/mercy. 

The second word , encouragement (paraklesis), is linked to the word for the Holy Spirit (the Paraclete). At the heart of both is the image of someone who is constantly by your side to console and advise every step of the way. This implies that we should be ready to listen. 

But St. Paul then tells what we must do with the encouragement/advise we receive from God. It is given not just to make us feel better, but

so that we may be able to encourage those who are in any affliction with the encouragement with which we ourselves are encouraged by God.

We receive from God so that we might pass on to others what we receive. We pray, we listen, we pass on to others who are suffering. 

Sunday, June 11, 2017

Trinity is not in the Bible

Is the word in the Bible? No, but like many other theological truths,the theology of the Holy Trinity permeates the New Testament. It has been a part of the Church's theology from the beginning. While there are a few groups who baptize in the name of Jesus only, most Christians practice trinitarian baptism as commanded by Jesus at the end of Matthew's gospel.

We can start with St. John,

God is Love.

Love is by definition relational. It requires more than one (unless you are a narcissist). There must be at least a Father and Son.

The Bible does not say that God began to love, after he created the world. The Scriptures say God is love. It is his essence. From before the creation of anything he was love itself.

St. Athanasius explain it using St. Paul,

...one God who is above all things and through all things and in all things. God is above all things as Father, for he is principle and source; he is through all things through the Word; and he is in all things in the Holy Spirit.

We also see it directly spelled out by St. Paul when he greets the people of Corinth,

The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ and the love of God and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all.

Here he uses God as synonymous with the Father.

As Christians we believe that all Divine action is carried out by the Father, through the Son, and in the Holy Spirit; from the creation of the universe to and beyond the end of time.

What does any of this mean for us now?

It goes far beyond sentiment, "God loves me." As the current Pope and his two predecessors have tried to remind us, because God is love, Mercy is also part of the very essence of God. St. John Paul added Divine Mercy Sunday to our calendar to call our attention to this attribute of God.

Our great problem is that we reduce Divine Mercy to human mercy. We see it as the opposite of Justice. Part of the great mystery of God is that justice and mercy in God are not separate but are one realty, two sides of the same coin, if you will.

So the next time one of us get the urge to say,"I demand justice," we must simultaneously ask, "Am I ready to give mercy." If we live in the Spirit and not in the flesh, we will not try to have one without the other.


Monday, June 5, 2017

LXX Old Testament

When we think of the Roman Empire, we think Latin. In fact, at the time of Jesus, Greek, not Latin, was the language of the Empire. Just as today we read our Bible in English, Jews of that time would have more often than not used the Greek translation called the Septuagent.

The name Septuagent comes from the Roman numeral LXX (70). It is the number of Jewish scholars who translated the Torah into Greek to make it accessible to the people. People in the time of Jesus did not speak Biblical Hebrew. Even Jesus spoke Aramaic.

St. Paul and the others who wrote the New Testament depended on the Septuagent when quoting the Old Testament. While it is true that later in history Judaism would reject the Septuagent, Catholic and Orthodox Bibles hold on to it because it was the Old Testament of the Early Church.

When we read the Septuagent we are reading not some later, rarified Hebrew Old Testament, but the Old Testament as it would have been read by the first Christian communities. Your Catholic Bible contains all of the books that would have been in the Septuagent. Other bibles have taken out some of the books. I am often perplexed by some Christian theologians who will quote St. Augustine and reject the Bible that he would have read.

Today we begin reading the book of Tobit. If you had asked St. Paul was it really part of the Bible, he would have said of course. It would not be until the 16th century that some Christians would reject it. It is not the case as I heard growing up that "Catholics added to the Bible." We simply remain faithful to the Old Testament that would have belonged to the earliest Christians.

The Book of Tobit is the story of a man who remains faithful to God's law even in exile. He is willing to risk everything to provide his fellows Jews with a proper burial. This week we will read not only how he suffered but how the angel Rafael came in disguise to assist him because of his faithfulness in things large and small.

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Paul or Pilate

We all remember, and not in good way, Pontius Pilate washing his hands of responsibility for the death of Jesus. It was his job to render the decision and no gesture of hand washing could change that truth.

On the other hand we have St. Paul, who shows us that there are times when it is appropriate to not take responsibility. In today's first reading St. Paul says to the people,

And so I solemnly declare to you this day that I am not responsible for the blood of any of you, for I did not shrink from proclaiming to you the entire plan of God.

St. Paul can rightly say he is not responsible because he has done what he can do. He has proclaimed the entire truth to them. What they do in response to that truth is personal responsibility of each individual.

All too often, particularly when dealing with family, we feel responsibility to help them, and by help them we mean fix them. We erroneously believe that being a good Christian means doing everything possible for our loved ones.

In fact, St. Paul reminds us today that we can advise others but ultimately each person has to be responsible for their own actions, for how they do or do not follow the way of the gospel. This also means that each person must accept the consequences of their choices.

We often want to keep others from all suffering. St. Paul proclaims the opposite. He knows that the very act of embracing the gospel is going to lead to suffering and, for some, death. Suffering is part of human life, and in a special way, the Christian life.

It is not always easy to discern when we are being Paul and when we are being Pontius Pilate. Prayer and often spiritual direction can assist us in the process, but ultimately we have to listen to the voice of our well-formed conscience.

Monday, May 29, 2017

The in between

What must those days have been like?— the days between the Ascension and Pentecost. It is hard to imagine the feeling of lose the Apostles and other disciples must have felt. We know that many drifted away. Disillusioned, they went back to their old life.

And yet, there were the few who had real faith; not faith as ascent to a list of beliefs, but faith in the sense of absolute trust in the words that Jesus spoke to them.

In today's gospel we hear the most outrageous claim in the gospel.

I have conquered the world

Jesus did not claim that he will conquer [future tense] it when he came back. Jesus claimed that he had [past tense] conquered it.

Some two thousand years later it is hard to see the signs of His having conquered the world. If we listen to the news and even some Christian preachers, you would think that this world is still firmly in the hands of Satan.

But here is where we must have faith. Faith reaches beyond the narrow spectrum of what the human eye can see and what the human ear can hear. Faith enables us to use our hearts to reach beyond sight and sound, and to trust that Jesus has, on the most real level of reality, already conquered the world.

If we look for them, we can in fact get glimpses of the victory. But we have to look for them.

With the Ascension Jesus did not simply go back to where He came from and leave them with nothing while they waited for the Spirit. He left them in a world that had been transformed,a world that He had already conquered.

As we start this week, let us believe the words of Jesus. Believe Him when he says, "I have conquered the world." And with the eyes of our hearts and souls we will see all around us the signs of the Victory that those without faith cannot see.


Monday, May 22, 2017

Preparing for Pentecost

June 4th the Church will celebrate the Feast of Pentecost. But the way our lectionary is structured we actually start two weeks out with readings that help us prepare for Pentecost.

In John's Gospel the Holy Spirit is called by another title. He is the parakletos. The most exact Latin translation would be Advocate, literally the one who is called to stand at your side. Today Jesus tells us:

When the Advocate comes whom I will send you from the Father, the Spirit of truth who proceeds from the Father, he will testify to me.

In our creed we say that He "proceeds from the Father and the Son." And in fact, Jesus says the same thing slightly differently. Jesus says that He will send the Spirit, and the Spirit is from the Father as well. The Spirit is from both Father and the Son.

It is the Spirit of Truth. It would be impossible to understate the importance of our belief that what the Spirit speaks is not a truth, but the Truth.

The Spirit testifies, the Greek word from which we get martyr. Its original meaning was to testify, to give witness.

The Holy Spirit is the wise counselor, but is also the witness.

But where do we fit into this picture?

Whether we use the Greek "Paraclete" or the Latin "Advocate," either implies there must be a call made, a call for help. Before there is a call for help, there must be a recognition of a need for help. And there's the rub.

The Son ascended to the Father, and the Holy Spirit (equally God) has been sent into this world to be the Advocate for every man, woman, and child; to give us wise counsel, to plead our cause, to lead us step by step on the path of salvation.

And yet, too many days we think and act as if we can do it on our own. We only want to call for help when we are in "real trouble." Otherwise, we want to run our own lives. We think that is freedom.

There may be no dumber person on earth than the one who thinks he is smarter than his lawyer.

You want to be smart? You want to be free? It's very simple. Walk through every day remembering that your Advocate is with you and don't say or do anything without clearing it first through Him.

Saturday, May 20, 2017

Humble Service

Yesterday we welcomed three new deacons into the clergy of the Diocese of Richmond. For priests, it is a reminder that a part of our Catholic theology of priesthood is the belief that when we are ordained priests we remain deacons. Even when one is ordained a bishop, one remains a priest and a deacons. Each successive ordination builds on the previous one. It does not replace it.

More broadly the ordination of a deacon is a reminder to every Christian that diakonia is the very foundation of every ministry in the Church. In the rite of ordination the meaning of diakonia is captured in two words, humble service.

The original seven deacons in the Acts 6 were ordained to care for the widows (and other needy people) so that the Apostles could focus on prayer and preaching. They were waiters and hence the name deacon.

In those moments when we are most honest with ourselves we can see that every day we wrestle with both words, humble and service. God is the Master and we are the servants.

At various points in the mass we kneel before God, we bow before God, we genuflect in God's presence. We physically lower ourselves. It can feel strange, awkward or uncomfortable because it is the opposite of what our ego and our culture calls us to do.

As we start a new week let us look for those small opportunities that we have each day to lower ourselves, to raise others up, to put them ahead of us, to let them go first — the chance to peace humble service.


Monday, May 15, 2017

Measuring Love

All Christians can recite the two great commandments: love God and love your neighbor as yourself. But my guess is most of us don't spend a lot of time thinking about the very real possibility that we don't love God.

If I call myself Christian, if I go to church, then I guess I love God. At least I love God enough.

In a single verse at the beginning of today's gospel Jesus gives us a very simple way that each of us can find a definite answer to the question: do I love God.

Whoever has my commandments and observes them is the one who loves me.

Notice he says "my commandments." He does not say "the 10 commandments given to Moses interpreted in the narrowest possible way." Jesus's commandments includes everything that he commanded us to do or not to do, not simply our narrow reading of the 10.

One of the great things about the Catechism of the Catholic Church is that you can go to Part Three/ Section 2 and you will see the combination of the 10 commandments and those things which Jesus taught which expanded and deepened our understanding of each of those commandments.

To the extent that I know and strive to keep these commandments, I can rightly say that I love Jesus, I love God. To the extent that I choose to remain ignorant, or chose to ignore certain commandments, I am forced to admit that I don't really love God. I chose love of self over love of God. I do my will and not His.

Perhaps it would be good over a period of day to take the commandments one by one in the Catechism. Read through each one. Meditate on each one. Ask the hard question. Am I really ready to embrace all that this commandment entails?

Only when we do our best each day to keep all of the commandments can we truly say that we love God.

Saturday, May 13, 2017

Fatima 100 years later

Today the town of Fatima Portugal hosted Pope Francis for the canonization of two children, and the 100th anniversary of the beginning apparitions of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

Having grown up Baptist, Marian devotion was probably the aspect of the Catholic faith I wrestled with the most. I understood the difference between devotion and worship. I understood that devotion to Mary, is supposed to deepen our relationship with Jesus. I had read the theory, but deep down inside I just didn't get it.

As far back as I can remember Jesus and I were always close. I could always talk with him. What else did I need?

It wasn't until the death of my own mother that I finally understood. It was when that relationship was ripped away that I realized its uniqueness. No, she had not been the one to give birth to me, but she was still my mother in every other sense of the word. And there is no substitute.

God made us male and female. Now more that ever we understand that this is more than an anatomical difference. And so, paternity and maternity are two distinct but complimentary realities. We need both in our lives.

It was shortly after my mother's death, that a friend in Rome pointed out to me that I had been ordained on the Feast of Our Lady of Fatima. I would mull that over for a couple a years before I finally made the pilgrimage.

There are some who will try and argue that Jesus teaching us to call God "Father" is mere cultural convention. The same people will argue that when God became incarnate it was as a man because he needed to fit in. It seems to me that there is more going than we can fully comprehend. When we call God "Father" there is a true paternity there.

Jesus understood God as his father and Mary as his mother. If all Christians can agree that we are to imitators of Christ, then how can we say that we are not supposed to imitate this.

At Fatima, I took a leap of faith. I stopped trying to find the fully rational explanation and embraced it. I had long ago embraced God as my father, and Jesus as my brother, there I embraced Mary as my mother.

We need the whole family. That I simple truth.




Friday, May 12, 2017

Rediscovering Truth

In today's gospel we hear one of the simplest and yet most profound statements in the Gospel, when Jesus describes himself with three words: way, truth, and life. That Jesus is the way to eternal life is the bold claim at the heart of the Christian message. But it is the middle word that we need to focus on, truth.

We live in a culture in which for the first time, the question of Pontius Pilate

What is truth? (Jn 18:38)

has become the central question of our time.

Gradually, over the last few decades at least, we have been sliding away from a belief in objective truth. More and more people conflate opinion and truth. Your opinion is "your truth." People are encouraged to find their own personal truth. This error is often dressed up as something profound. It is simply wrong and dangerous.

The corollary danger is that if there is no such thing as truth, then there is no such thing as a lie. That person isn't lying, they are only speaking their truth. And at that point lies become like wire grass in the lawn, enmeshed.

Some act horrified as day after day statements coming from the White House are shown to be factually incorrect. And yet we have no one to blame but ourselves. Some want to blame the culture but we are the culture. We, collectively, create the culture. We have created this culture of personal subjective truth, alternative facts.

Let us pray that the current crisis will force left and right to come together around some fundamentals.

There is such a thing as objective truth.

It is knowable.

And we should all want to hear it, even when it runs contrary to what we want to believe.

The truth is the truth. A lie is a lie.

Without searching for the Truth we will never find the Way that leads to the Life.

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Knowing Our History

Some Christians act as though Christianity is merely a philosophy or spirituality. We read the Bible and we glean from Jesus instructions about how we should live. I once had a rabbi tell me that if it was absolutely proven that Moses never existed it would not chain his faith. His faith is rooted in a book of law, the Torah.

Christianity is different. Our faith in not rooted in a book but in a person, Jesus Christ. Our faith is rooted in historical events: his passion, death, and resurrection. We believe that through those event God opened the way to salvation for humanity. Take away those historical events there would be no Christian faith.

Because ours is an historical religion, we should not be ignorant of our history. Not just what is in the Bible but how the Holy Spirit has guided the Church since.

In our first reading today we hear the story of how the Spirit led to the rise of the Church in Antioch. How it became the cradle of Greek-speaking Christianity. It was at Antioch that Christianity as we now know it took shape under the guidance of St. Paul. It was in Antioch that the word Christian came into being.

Too many Christians think only of Bethlehem, Nazareth, and Jerusalem, the cities of Hebrew Christianity. But the vast majority of us are the children of Greek Christianity, Gentile Christianity. There is a reason our New Testament is not in Hebrew but Greek.

As we study the early history it is important to note that the Church did not spring up in a random fashion,with groups of people forming their own communities and choosing their leaders. The Spirit guided the formation of the Church, and like the story of creation itself there was order in the formation of the Church, so that the link to the Apostles was always maintained.

Sometimes we get the urge to take out our Bibles and jump straight from the Bible to the 21st Century, as if the Bible were only a book of moral principles. The Bible tells only the beginning of salvation history, the earthly life of Jesus and the beginnings of the Church. To be truly Christian is to hunger to see how the Holy Spirit has guided the ongoing formation of the Church, century by century.



Monday, May 8, 2017

Transforming the Church

For American Catholics today the Second Vatican Council was the most transformative event in their lifetime. There are those who think it went too far and those who think it did not go far enough; those who think it ruined the Church, and those who think it is their job to fix what got ruined.

What we forget in all this argument is that throughout the Church's history there have been many moments when the Holy Spirit called the Church to radical transformation. Today's first reading takes us back to the first of these internal earthquakes.

In the first reading today from the Acts of the Apostles we hear the proclamation:

God has then granted life-giving repentance to the Gentiles too.

From its inception the Church had been Jewish. After all, didn't Jesus say regarding the Gentiles,

It is not right to give the children's bread to the dogs.

We of course know that this statement was merely a test and not one of exclusion, but many in the early Church were afraid of the Church losing its Jewish identity. For them, to be a Christian meant first of all being a Jew. A Gentile was welcome only if they converted to Judaism first. In the book of Acts we see this early struggle played out and resolved at the first great Council in Jerusalem.

It reminds us of how the Holy Spirit works. Sometimes the Spirit gently guides the Church, little by little. At other moments the Spirit gives her a good shake. What the Spirit never does is let the Church wander too far off the road.

We should not be scandalized by in-fighting in the Church. The Bible tells us such in-fighting has been there from the beginning. As long as there are the imperfect humans in the Church, there will be struggles. And the Holy Spirit uses those struggles to move the Church forward on the road to her final destination.

As long as we hold on tight to the Church, we need not fear, remember the word in John 21 regarding the role of Peter

even though there were so many, the net was not torn.


Saturday, May 6, 2017

Peace and conflict

Today's reading from chapter 9 of the Acts of the Apostles seems to open with a romanticized image of a Church that could never have existed.

The Church throughout all Judea, Galilee, and Samaria was at peace.

But this description is only romanticized if we misunderstand the word peace.

For far too many people, peace is the absence of conflict. This kind of peace can mask some of the most unhealthy situations in the world: in families, in organizations, especially churches. Especially churches because people who go into ministry are often conflict averse in the extreme. When the desire to avoid conflict is our guiding principle, no matter how "ministry" we do, we cannot carry out the mission of the Church, the conversion of the world.

Peace as the scriptures understand it is not the absence of conflict but right relationship. To be at peace is to be constantly striving to live in right relationship with God, his body (the Church), and all who are our neighbor.

This is particularly difficult in our time because it assumes that there is such a thing as an objectively right relationship. There is right relationship and there is wrong relationship.

We know this right and wrong in three ways.

We know it first of all by that fundamental law that God has hard wired into humanity. We call this natural law. There is no culture in the world where stealing or lying are considered good. Some may argue that it is allowable in dealing with people they think of as the enemy but they would never say it is good in itself.

As Christians, we also know right and wrong relationship through what we Catholics refer to as "divine positive law", the truth that God has revealed to us in his Word, the Bible.

Lastly, we know it through the Church when she exercises her teaching function, magisterium, from the Latin word for teacher, magister. We believe that the Holy Spirit is alive and continues to help the Church properly apply the teaching revealed in the Bible to the challenges we face today.

Jesus in St. Matthew tells us to be perfect. We can call it perfection, peace, or holiness. To be at peace, to be holy, to be perfect is to embrace the idea that there is an established order to human life. I am supposed to behave in a certain way toward God, toward my bishop, toward the people I serve, toward my family and friends, toward strangers. There is always a right and wrong relationship.

Step two is recognizing that we all fall short. And here is where conflict is not only inevitable but necessary. If we are all called to perfection, to holiness of life, and if we are all one; then we need our brothers and sisters to challenge us and support us as we strive to be better. To overcome our inertia, our tendency to stay the same. For object to person to move friction is required. On a frictionless surface nothing moves.

St. Paul was a man at peace who constantly was engaged in healthy conflict, acknowledging his own flaws and simultaneously challenging others to be better, more conformed to Christ.

How do I know healthy conflict which is part of peace from the unhealthy conflict that is incompatible with Christian life? Ask yourself one simple question, "Am I truly striving to help my brother or sister to find holiness or am I simply trying to impose my will, to get them to do things my way?" Your conscience will know the answer.




Thursday, May 4, 2017

Embracing life

If you watch the coverage of the Catholic Church in the media you would walk away with the notion that when. Catholics are described as pro-life, all it means is that we are anti-abortion.

Today's gospel reminds us that at the very center of the Christian faith is Life. Today Jesus puts it very simply,

whoever believes has eternal life.

There are two details we should not over look.

Firstly, the life he is talking about is not the biological life we received when we were conceived. It was the life we received when we were reborn in baptism: the most common baptism with water, baptism of blood (those martyred before receiving the sacrament), or baptism of desire.

In baptism we receive a new and eternal life. This new life does not replace our biological life or make it meaningless, but it does place it in a new context.

Secondly, we should note that the gospel doesn't say "will have" in the future, he says "has" in the present. While we do not yet have this new life in its fullness, we do possess it now.

The daily challenge for us is to fully embrace the gift we have received. We constantly experience the temptation to be drawn downward, to live a purely material earthly life. Particularly in the Easter Season the readings constantly call us upward. They call us to be more than we are.

Today and every day during this Easter Season in particular it is important for us to pause from our regular activity and remember what we have inside us. Only when we truly believe that we have eternal life will be power of that life be able to transform us.



Monday, May 1, 2017

Catholic Labor Day

In many counties with an historically strong Catholic culture, today, the Feast of St. Jospeh the Worker, is Labor Day. It is time for us to remember that our Catholic anthropology, our understanding of the human person, includes a proper understanding of the place of work.

We understand that humans beings need to be productive, we have a need and therefore a right to gainful employment. We have an obligation give our employer our best, and the corresponding right to receive a just wage in exchange. One can watch the development of the Church's teaching from Rerum Novarum through the document written by St. John Paul II, Centesimus Annus marking the 100th anniversary of the same.

Unfortunately our language reveals our attitudes. Those who used to be PERSONnel are now referred to as human RESOURCES. A resource is by definition something to be used. In places like Virginia "Right to Work" is twisted to mean right to fire without cause. And sadly, in many places, instead of leading, Catholic organizations are trying to emulate the corporate model. On this Feast of St. Jospeh the Worker we Catholics need to lead with the Gospel, the truth of the dignity of every person. The Church should never become a business.

In our American culture, there is another insidious tendency, linking our identity to our work. Yes, God intended us to work, but work was always meant to be the means not the end. We tend too often to tie our worth to our salary or our title. You could be scrubbing toilets, but if in your heart you are able to offer that as service, as an expression of the command to love your neighbor, it can become an aid on the road to personal holiness which is the goal of every human life. The Second Vatican Council reminded us of the universal call to holiness. Our work can and should be, not only a way to earn a living, but a step on our path to holiness. If you work in an office you can see it either as meaningless paper work, or you can choose to see the human beings that each of those pieces of paper represent. And all work can and should be lifted up as an offering to God.

In short, today's feast reminds us that the worker must always be understood to be more important than the work. The work will all pass away, but the worker is intended to live forever with God.

Sunday, April 30, 2017

Emmaus as the model

When we think of mass, we tend to immediately think of the Last Supper. Today's gospel however, is just as important for our understanding of why we do what we do. In some ways we are always the disciples on the road to Emmaus.

As the story begins the two disciples have walked away from the Church. It didn't turn out to be what they expected. They cannot understand. They are walking along wrestling with their faith.

Jesus joins them and the "liturgy" begins. Jesus pretends to know nothing and has them retell the story. Jesus then has to explain the meaning of the story. He reaches all the way back to Moses and helps them see the connections, as any good homilist does.

Is is the first half of Mass, the Liturgy of the Word. We tell the story in the readings and the priest, like Christ, helps us to understand and see the connection to the events of our lives.

But most important is the Liturgy of the Eucharist. St. Luke uses the four classic verbs for every celebration of the Eucharist: took, blessed, broke, and gave. Only in the Eucharist are their eyes opened to the presence of Jesus in their midst.

And notice how the story ends. They return to the Church, to the Apostles.

We are all the disciples on the road. We wander away through sin. We are sometimes disappointed in the Church that we see. Like those disciples we don't see Jesus doing what we think he should do in this world right now. Wandering seems to be just part of what we humans do.

It is worth noting however that at no point is a disciple in this story acting alone. Our culture worships individuality. This gospel reminds us that to be Christian is to be a part of the Church.

Every Sunday, the Lord's Day, we come home. We gather with our all too imperfect brothers and sisters and we relive the story of Emmaus.

The sad truth is that all to many of our brothers and sisters have wandered off down the road for a variety of reasons, some which are completely understandable. They need that encounter with Jesus just like the disciples on the road to Emmaus. And it is our duty to bring Jesus to them, to walk with them, to listen to them, to help them understand and to bring them back to the Table of the Lord.






Friday, April 28, 2017

Staying Focused

With the ever increasing amount of information flying at us all day long, it would appear that we are all losing the ability to simply pay attention. Some want to blame technology but even the most advanced technology is still a thing, not a person who can be held responsible. Technology may be attractive but we human beings are always the moral agents, responsible for our actions.

Today we reach the end of chapter 5 of Acts and it ends with a powerful image of the apostles,

And all day long, both at the temple and in their homes, they did not stop teaching and proclaiming the Christ, Jesus

In a world where we are so easily distracted and allow ourselves to be pulled in a variety of directions we need to be regularly reminded that the what we teach and proclaim is JESUS.

It's 2017 and we Catholics are still fighting battles from the middle of the previous century: what language should mass be in, which direction should the priest face, is a priest in a cassock or a nun in a habit somehow holier.

Worse yet, we now seem to want to divide ourselves in Pope John Paul vs. Pope Francis Catholics. In parishes, we allow ourselves to get so attached to a pastor that a change can rip the community apart.

We are like the Christians in Corinth who had divided their allegiance between Paul and Apollos. It was Paul himself who had to remind them that it must all be about Jesus.

Jesus himself established the three unchangeable realities: the irreformable truths, the seven sacraments, and the hierarchical structure of His Church. All the rest changes, legitimately, under the guidance of the Holy Spirit. Change is a constant and inevitable part of life.

As Christians, our most powerful tool for dealing with it is to follow the example of the apostles by constantly proclaiming the Christ, Jesus, in our words and in our actions.



Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Jailers or Angels

In chapter 5 of Acts we hear how they

"laid hands upon the Apostles and put them in the public jail.But during the night, the angel of the Lord opened the doors of the prison."

On the surface this seems disconnected from our life.  No one is going to come and lock us up for being Christian. But there is another level on which it is very much a part of our culture.

From the beginning of history human beings have sought to categorized not just things but people. We have an uncanny ability to recognize and distinguish "us" from "them." We love to label: race, language, nationality, and in our modern age psychology - from the most benign Personality Type categories to the ever popular ADD, ADHD, OCD, and the current flavor of the month: Autism Spectrum/ Aspergers.

This is not to say that all of the above and more are not valid and useful for helping people understand their particular challenges. The danger is that this becomes the modern jail. We label human beings and then in-prison them in the label, and it is a life sentence.

We forget that at the heart of our Christian understanding of the human person is our belief in the transforming power of God's grace. We forget that one of the things that separate the human being from the rest of creation is our free will, our ability to choose. Living the Christian life means always striving each day to be more, to be more fully conformed to Christ.

As Christians we are called to be angels not jailers.We should always be seeking to set people free, not lock them up in our limited understanding of who they are. As Jesus proclaimed to the crowd "Untie him and let him go!"

We must be the people who never lose hope. No matter how long or difficult the struggle, no matter how many times we fall along the road.









Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Mark the Evangelist

When we Latin Rite Catholics think of St. Mark, we may of the great Basilica and Square in Venice. But there is a much older place we should call to mind, Alexandria in Egypt.

In the history of Christianity there are five great centers: Jerusalem, Rome, Antioch, Constantinople (Istanbul), and Alexandria. We think of Egypt and we think Moslems. But long before the Islamic religion came into existence St. Mark who wrote the gospel, went to Egypt somewhere around 42 AD and established Christianity. He was the first Bishop of Alexandria. The Christians who trace their religious heritage to St. Mark are known by the language they still use in their liturgy, Coptic.

Unfortunately many Christians who knew nothing of the history heard the word Coptic for the first time on Palm Sunday when two of their churches were attacked. One of the churches that was attacked was St. Mark's Cathedral in Alexandria.

Today as the Church celebrates the Feast of St. Mark let each of us pray for our Coptic brothers and sisters not only in Egypt but scattered around the world. Every time we read the gospel of St. Mark we should remember them, members of one of the oldest Christians churches in the world.





Monday, April 24, 2017

To. Boldly Go

Twice in the first reading from Acts chapter 4 St. Luke refers to the apostles speaking boldly.

We should be careful not to confuse bold and brash. St. Luke is very careful in his choice of words. He borrows a word that would have been known from Greek philosophy.

The boldness of which St. Luke writes has three characteristics:

1) it is dedicated to speaking the truth. The truth for Christians is grounded always in Jesus who is The Truth.

2) it is spoken for the common good, not for the benefit of the speaker.

3) it is spoken at some risk. The speaker places himself in danger to speak the truth for the benefit of others.

To be truly bold in this sense requires that we Christians examine carefully our motives. Many Christian preachers, Catholic and other, have claimed to be speaking boldly when all they were really doing was playing to their base, as it is called in politics. Their so-called boldness was never directed against their major donors.

As Christians our starting point is always one of love. We never speak for the shock value, to wound or offend. On the other hand we must be willing to risk losing position, power, privilege, or even our closest relationships if necessary to be true to the gospel. (The chance that as 21st century Americans we will risk our lives is slim.)

Our starting point, and perhaps the most difficult challenge, is letting the gospel speak boldly to us. What are those possessions and pleasure that each of us needs to sacrifice to live a more authentically Christian life.



Sunday, April 23, 2017

Doubt vs. Suspicion

Today we complete the octave of Easter, the eighth day, the first day of the new creation. It is the day the neophytes, those baptized at the Easter Vigil would traditionally lay aside their white garments. When you go to mass today, notice how the prayers focus on baptism. It is also the day when we read about Doubting Thomas.

This may seem a strange coupling, the newly baptized and doubt. But that is only because we misunderstand the place of doubt on our lives. Doubt is not the opposite of faith.

On Sunday each section of the creed begins with "I believe." The opposite would not be doubt but denial.

I believe in God. (a believer)
I deny the existence of God. ( an atheist)

These are the two extremes, Doubt fall in the middle, but is closer to belief. Doubt questions but is willing to be convinced. Doubt is still listening.

The problem we face today is not Doubt, but its opposite, Suspicion. We live in a world where we are encouraged to be suspicious of any authority or institution. What we fail to see is how suspicion isolates us. If I am suspicious of all authority, then where do I go for answers?

Suspicion questions but is not really open to hearing the answer, because it will not trust the teacher, the source from which it could learn. Suspicion cannot accept the truth even when it hears it.

As Christians we are called be disciples: a word that means students. The true disciple is never content but always seeks to know more, to understand more fully. Doubt can be a powerful motivator, the voice that constantly questions, and listens for the answer. As the voice from the cloud told the apostles:

This is my chosen Son; listen to him

Today's gospel opens by telling us,

They devoted themselves to the teaching of the apostles (didache ton apostolon) and the communal life.

Notice that it does not say, "They sat at home alone and read their Bibles."

When we say we believe in "one, holy, catholic and apostolic church." We do not simply mean that it was founded on the apostles. We believe that the teaching role of the apostles continues in the Church even now. We believe that the Holy Spirit is alive and continues to lead the Church into an ever deepening understanding of our faith.

The apostles went out and established local communities. St Thomas went as far east as what we call Kerala, India. As they moved from place to place, the apostles passed on their teaching authority to local bishops (episkopoi), which as been handed down from generation to generation. Even now our bishops serve as the successors to the Apostles, to carry on the teaching.

We all have questions. There are always going to be pieces of the "teaching of the apostles" with which we wrestle. But do we question with the doubt of Thomas, or have we have we fallen into suspicion and mistrust?

As the father of the boy in Mark 9 exclaimed,

I do believe, help my unbelief.

Today's gospel says they devoted themselves to the teaching of the apostles and the communal life. Our doubts cannot be resolved in isolation. We bring our doubts, our unbelief, to the Church, we question and listen. We read the Bible and we also read the Catechism to help us understand. We join in the communal prayer of the Church, the liturgy. Even when we are not sure, we trust, because we remain grounded in love, not only love of God, but love of his people, love of the Church.


Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Believing in forgiveness

In today's gospel we witness the prediction of the most famous denial in history. Peter is not just a disciple of Jesus but one of the great apostles.

Peter said to him, “Master, why can I not follow you now? I will lay down my life for you.”

His enthusiasm and good intentions are unmatched. And yet,

Jesus answered, “Will you lay down your life for me? Amen, amen, I say to you, the cock will not crow before you deny me three times.”

And of course we know the rest of that story. But what is interesting to notice is how that story played out in the long run.

Jesus, after the resurrection, gives Peter the chance to undo his triple denial, with the triple affirmation of love in John's gospel. And Peter goes on to be not just an apostle, the the Rock on which the Church is built, establishing the office we now refer to as Pope.

Imagine how that might have played out today. Would there have been this total, true forgiveness of his sin. More likely, the story of the denial would have gone viral on the internet. There would have certainly been calls for him to be removed as an apostle. And to avoid scandal he would have probably been tucked away from public view. After all, we couldn't have someone who denied Jesus in a leadership position in the Church.

All too often in this age we say we forgive, while in reality there is always a "but." No matter how many years pass, and even when the public figure is not found guilty. There is always the cloud, the stain. And the internet guarantees that nothing is forgotten.

Sadly we Christians are no more forgiving than the culture at large. If anything, we can often be worse, less tolerant of imperfection.

Yes, Peter did just as Jesus predicted; when put to the test, he failed. But in the true Church, that did not stop him from going on to faithfully carry the highest possible office. And ultimately he did as he said and gave his life for Jesus. Peter the denier and Paul the murderer were the two great leaders of the faith.

As this season of Penance comes to a close may we not only receive the gift of forgiveness but may we rediscover what it means to truly forgive.

Monday, April 10, 2017

Celebrating Our Unity

On this second day of Holy Week we in the Diocese of Richmond will gather this evening at 6 PM for the one mass each year when a diocese celebrates the unity that Jesus called for in Jn 17,

Consecrate them in the truth. Your word is truth. As you sent me into the world, so I sent them into the world... so that they may all be one, as you, Father, are in me and I in you, that they also may be in us, that the world may believe that you sent me.

While this mass is normally celebrated during the day on Holy Thursday, because of the geographical size of the diocese, our Bishop moves this mass to Monday so that the largest possible number of the clergy and lay faithful can participate.

It is called the Chrism Mass because it is here that the Bishop consecrates Chrism, and blesses the Oil of the Sick and Oil of Catechumens to be used in churches around the diocese. Chrism is not just blessed but consecrated because it is the oil used in the sacraments that impart the Holy Spirit in a permanent way: Baptism, Confirmation and Ordination. Through the one Holy Spirit we are made one Church.

This is also the mass at which the unique role of priests as the closest collaborators of the bishop is celebrated. In the words of the Second Vatican Council:

Bishops should always embrace priests with a special love since the latter to the best of their ability assume the bishops' anxieties and carry them on day by day so zealously. They should regard the priests as sons and friends and be ready to listen to them. Through their trusting familiarity with their priests they should strive to promote the whole pastoral work of the entire diocese. (CD 16)

Here in Richmond this year's Chrism Mass marks the beginning of a transition. On Saturday Bishop DiLorenzo will celebrate his 75th birthday and send to the Holy Father his letter of resignation. In all likelihood this will be his last Chrism Mass as Bishop of Richmond.  For the priests in the diocese we are reminded that our promise of respect and obedience is to the office and not the individual bishop. When we are ordained we promise respect and obedience not just to the bishop who ordains us but to his successors, no matter who they are. For the unity of the Church,  each time a new bishop is installed we must lay aside the natural affinity that we have for the bishop who ordained us, the bishop that we know; and give our full respect and obedience to the one Bishop of Richmond from the moment of his installation.

When the Chrism Mass is complete the priests take the oils out across the diocese and for the next year maintain the unity of the Church in the proclamation of the gospel, and the celebration of sacraments. From the grandeur of the Cathedral to the smallest parish church in the most remote corner of the diocese, we remain the one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church founded by Christ 2000 years ago.


Sunday, April 9, 2017

Embracing the Passion

It has been almost 50 years (1970) since the new name for today's celebration was set, Dominica in palmis de Passione Domini, a combination of Passion Sunday and Palm Sunday. It is the only Sunday with two gospels: the triumphal entry into Jerusalem and the Passion. And yet, most Catholics still just call it Palm Sunday. Why is that?

While a part of the reason is a combination of tradition and lack of catechesis, I wonder if a part of it isn't also our desire to evade the passion. Even the word has been watered down. At its heart it means "suffering," and yet, in modern English it simply refers to any strong emotion— "She has a passion for cooking."

We Catholics run from suffering. While the crucifix used to be the symbol that identified Catholic churches, homes, classrooms, and hospitals, even there, many have opted for the more palatable "resurrected Jesus" or empty cross.

Today we do not run. The bulk of today's liturgy is the reading of The Passion according to St. Matthew. And perhaps the most striking feature of St. Matthew's Passion is silence.

On Good Friday we will hear the Passion according to St. John. In his version Jesus has a response to every comment or question. He is in charge of the proceedings. By contrast, St. Matthew portrays Jesus as the suffering servant, the Lamb of sacrifice. Jesus embraces his suffering in silence — not the silence of resignation, but the silence of true acceptance and absolute trust in the Father.

Perhaps today is a good time for each of us to spend some time in silence, to honestly call to mind the sufferings large and small in our own lives, to one by one unite our sufferings to the sufferings of Christ, and with the peace that comes only from God walk with Jesus through His Suffering and Death, the only true path to Resurrection.

May this be a truly Holy Week!


Saturday, April 8, 2017

Ephemera

With Evening Prayer today we enter into Holy Week, those days when we are called to step out of earthly time (in Greek chronos) and immerse ourselves in God's time (kairos). There we will accompany Jesus as he completes the mission for which he was sent, the salvation of the Father's most beloved creature, humanity.

On our own, despite our power and creativity we could not save ourselves. We could and can create marvelous technology, art and music. Original Sin could not destroy all the good God gave us when we were made. And yet, the ultimate good, union with our maker was beyond our grasp. We reach but fall away.

In the first reading today we hear the promise made through the Prophet Isaiah.

No longer shall they defile themselves with their idols, their abominations, and all their transgressions. I will deliver them from all their sins of apostasy, and cleanse them so that they may be my people and I may be their God...my sanctuary shall be set up among them forever.

This week we recall that moment when God stepped into our world, our time, to fulfill that promise and open for us the way to eternal life.

We live in a world filled with shiny objects clamoring for our attention. We forget how ephemeral it all is, how it will all pass away. In the gospel today we are reminded not once but twice that Chaiaphas was high priest that year. His position, his power lasted only a moment.

In this Holy Week let us stop fretting over things that will pass, and let us walk with our Lord as he enters Jerusalem, to suffer, die and rise so that we might have a new and everlasting life.

Sunday, March 19, 2017

Grace as necessary gift

We who are alive in the 21st century should have an even deeper appreciation of today's gospel than the original heater. After all, we understand at a much deeper level the biological importance of water and its importance not only to human life but to all life. Without water there is no life. I still find it hard to grasp that my body is more than 60% water. Without food we can survive around 3 weeks. Without water we would be lucky to survive one.

So it is with God's grace. Our souls need grace the way our bodies need water — even more so perhaps. After all, the soul cannot die. The condition it can end up in is worse than death. We call it hell.

What Jesus is offering the woman at the well is nothing less than a share in his divine life. We call that grace. Jesus is offering her the grace that leads to eternal life. This grace comes to us above all in the sacraments.

Here we American Catholics need to be very careful. With an over abundance of zeal we can turn the sacraments into the equivalent of merit badges, something to be earned, something to be given to only the pure of heart.

The catechism says that,"Grace is favor, the free and undeserved help that God gives us to respond to his call to become children of God, adoptive sons, partakers of the divine nature and of eternal life." It is not that we hear the call, respond to it, and then are worthy to receive grace. The grace is what enables us to respond in the first place. The preface for today's mass reminds us,

For when he asked the Samaritan woman for water to drink,
he had already created the gift of faith within her
and so ardently did he thirst for her faith,
that he kindled in her the fire of divine love.


It wa God's grace at work in her that enabled her to respond. It is true that we must be "rightly disposed" to receive sacraments, but that proper disposition cannot be reduced to a checklist. It is something to be discerned by those entrusted with the care of souls. After all, there is no more precious gift that one can receive than the grace of God. That is why the church is so careful about how sacraments are celebrated and how we prepare to receive them. But in our zeal we must never forget that the free and unmerited quality of grace. "Lord I am not worthy...."

Grace — water for the soul. In this Lenten season let us drink fully and often, especially through the sacraments of reconciliation and Eucharist. And if there are obstacles in our lives, choices that we have made that are irreconcilable with the gospel. There is no better time to al least begin to move those obstacles so that we can get to the well. Jesus can prepare us in the same way he prepared the woman at the well. When Jesus named her grave sin, she did argue. Tradition tells us that she went back and changed her life and became a saint in the early Church. Now is the time for us to change, to turn away from sin, to turn toward the well and receive the water of eternal life.

Monday, March 13, 2017

A Day without Judgement

As we begin a new week, we are told,

Stop judging and you will not be judged. Stop condemning and you will not be condemned. Forgive and you will be forgiven.

We have heard this reading so often that the gravity of it may not register as it should. Perhaps if we write the other side we can hear it better.

Judge and you will be judged. Condemn and you will be condemned. Do not forgive, and you will not be forgiven.

We have all grown up so much on the image of the last judgement that we simply assume that judgement is inevitable. And yet, unless Jesus is lying, we can be spared that judgement. All we have to do is stop judging. Easier said than done. But it can be done. Like everything it requires practice.

The easiest first step may be external. When that judging thought about someone else enters our mind, stop it before we speak it or write it. Don't let it into the external world. If we stop nourishing our judgements thoughts over time they will die. We can turn not judging into a habit.

Does this mean that the temptation to judge and condemn will go away? No. In this life we are always going to face temptation, but we can make huge progress. And there is no better time than Lent to do.

Start with one day. Today. Try your best to live this one day without speaking or writing one judging or condemning comment about another person. It is not impossible, if we believe.

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Keep it simple

In today's gospel we hear what is possibly the best known and simplest summary of the Christian rule for all human interactions.

Do to others whatever you would have them do to you. This is the law and the prophets

And yet, this one sentence, as simple as it is, seems to be very difficult for us to live, either individually or collectively.

In the 20th century we dreamed of how technology would help us to span great distance and close the gaps between distant peoples.

In the 21st century what we experience is ever increasing isolation, and decreasing amounts of face to face communication. With the growing amount of self-service and online activity the requirement that we actually speak face to face with another person has all but vanished. Those tiny interactions( the gas station, the bank, the store ) in which we practiced the skills of civility or manners have slowly faded away. Email, voicemail, and texting allow us to fire off comments from a distance that we perhaps would not say face to face, and online posts and "comments" provide a safe haven for our most base and often cowardly acts. Technology that should help bring us together has enabled each of us to retreat into our own customized world, and deep down people feel more alone than ever.

As we hear the golden rule it is not only a reminder to us about how we are to interact but also a reminder about our basic human need to interact.

It is not good for the man to be alone.

Even the most introverted need not virtual but actual human interaction. As we strive to life during Lent, perhaps before we fire off another email or text it is time to pick up a phone, or even walk down the hall or into the other room and look someone in the eye, smile and speak to them face to face showing the respect that every person deserves. And if you are more comfortable texting, perhaps you should give up that comfort for Lent.

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

The Lost Virtue

In addition to Friday, Wedensday was historically a day for fasting in the Church. And so, it is not surprising that today's first reading is Jonah's entrance into Nineveh  and the call for repentance and fasting.  It is easy for us to overlook the important details at the center of this story.

When the news reached the king of Nineveh, he rose from his throne, laid aside his robe, covered himself with sackcloth, and sat in the ashes.

Sometimes we fail to understand the significance of these details because we think of the "world of the Bible" as if it were a different world than the one we inhabit. It was not. Human nature has not changed greatly over the centuries, and the quest to have and keep power was as real as ever. If anything it was even more necessary then for a king to never show weakness. And yet the king of Nineveh did.

Firstly, he demonstrated a willingness to listen.  He could have easily dismissed Jonah. He could have denounced his message. After all, Jonah was telling the people of Nineveh that they were on the wrong path. He could have  had him executed for stirring up the people. Instead he was willing to listen to the criticism.  The king not only listened but accepted personal responsibly.  He did not try and blame others (as Adam attempted to blame Eve).

Secondly, he committed to changing directions.  His actions of rising from his throne and laying aside his cloak demonstrated his acknowledgment that being a king did not make him incapable or error or sin. His covering himself in sackcloth and ashes was a very public manifestation of contrition and desire for conversion.

As a king he had to have understood how some might see this as a sign of weakness and an opportunity to attack, to seize power. A king sitting in sackcloth and ashes was an unimaginable sight.   How would it look to the people? Some had to think it was undignified. And yet this king did it. He was able to do it because he possessed the virtue of humility.

This story puts before us some very basic questions. Do we really believe in being humble –outside of Church? And do we want leaders who publicly manifest humility?







Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Believing in the invisible

Today we hear the Lord tell us through the prophet Isaiah,

So shall my word be that goes forth from my mouth; It shall not return to me void, but shall do my will, achieving the end for which I sent it.

This concept of the power of God's Word is seen throughout the scriptures all the way back to the very beginning of Genesis where God creates the universe by speaking.

It is important to note that it is the spoken word that contains this power, the word that "goes forth from my mouth." So often when we use the phrase the word of God we immediately think of the Bible. We want to limit ourselves to the written Word. It would be a grave mistake to think that God did to speak before or after the revelation contained in scripture. But our tendency to limit God's speaking to the Bible is really part of a larger problem, our modern tendency to limit reality to what we can perceive.

From a scientific point of view we know that the human visible spectrum of light is only a small portion of a much larger whole. There are animals that can see what is invisible to us. The same is true of sound. The range of frequencies that we can hear is actually quite small. And yet, if we cannot see it or hear it with our eyes, ears or technology; we tend to doubt its presence. It's not really real. Invisible reality is relegated to the realm of science fiction and fantasy. And God is in heaven.

When we walk into a church and we see the tabernacle, what do we see? Can we see with the eyes of faith? Many Christians have become so trapped at the level of the material visible world that they have given up all together on the concept of Christ being truly present in the Sacrament. Even many Catholics find it hard to believe what their eyes cannot see. They see the tabernacle as only a shiny box. The idea of church as sanctuary, place of the Holy, has all but vanished.

One of the things we all need to give up for Lent is skepticism. We must give up our narrow-minded view of the world. We must remember just how much of reality exists beyond the limits of our senses. If we cannot perceive the Holy in a church or chapel, how can we ever hope to perceive it in the world.

The paradox of our faith is that the most real things in the universe, the eternal, are also the invisible.

Saturday, March 4, 2017

Hearing the call

In these first four days before the first Sunday of Lent the Church eases us into the season. In today's Gospel we are reminded by Jesus of something which we all know and will say, but i'm not sure how fully we believe it. Jesus tells the Pharisees:

I have not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners.

We will very easily say that we are all sinners, but deep down inside, if we are honest, there is a self-righteous streak in everyone of us. We tend to minimize our own sins and aggrandize the sins of others.

We act as though online sin is less sinful than live sin in the world. We will say things online we would never say to a person's face.

We depersonalize sin, and bemoan the decaying culture or the media, as if they are something apart from us. We, the people, are the culture; and the media gives us what we want to see and hear.

We forget that sin is always personal. It is the choice of an individual to act contrary to God's law. Sin is always in the first person. I know right from wrong and I willfully choose to do wrong.

For the next 5 1/2 weeks every time we get the urge to criticize another person, we should spin that critical light around and point it at our self. Lent is about naming our sins, all of our sins not just the ones we are comfortable naming, feeling true sorrow for them, and confessing them.

When we are willing to plumb the depths of our sins, then we will understand today's gospel and we will indeed hear the merciful voice of Jesus calling.


Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Self-Resraint

As we spend this first day of Lent fasting, perhaps it is good for us to slow down and listen carefully to the words of today's collect.

Grant, O Lord, that we may begin with holy fasting
this campaign of Christian service,
so that, as we take up battle against spiritual evils,
we may be armed with weapons of self-restraint.


Campaign of Christian service, battle against spiritual evil, weapons of self-restraint. These are all images that many 21st century Christians can be uncomfortable with. We like to think of peaceful Jesus. Images of war are difficult for us to embrace. But if we look closely we notice that, as Jesus so often does, he turns the image on its head.

The battle is not against some human foe. It is the internal battle against spiritual evil, the battle we fight each day to avoid sin. The weapons are not guns, but the weapon of self-restraint. The campaign is not to retake some piece of land, but is a campaign of Christian service, a turning away from caring for self, and a focus on caring for others.

Today we do indeed begin a war, but our greatest enemy in this war may we'll be our self: our habitual ways of thinking and behaving, our tendency to focus on our own needs, wants and desires.

Our culture tells us to do what makes us happy. Self-restraint is truly counter-cultural and may we'll be the word we need to remind ourselves of every day of Lent.

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Ready to fast

In many places around the world the tradition of Carnival (Latin for putting aside meat) or Mardi Gras (French for Tuesday of Fat/Grease) have become incredibly popular but disconnected from their roots. As Christians, we need to stay connected. Whether you choose the name carnival which underscores the older tradition still practiced by many Christians of not eating any meat through all of Lent, or the name Mardi Gras which underscored even the giving up of lard and other meat products; each of these names draws to the importance of tomorrow's fast. Eat it today because tomorrow you go hungry.

On Ash Wednesday we not only abstain from meat, but are also supposed to actually fast. The minimalist will always ask how much they can eat and still call it fasting. The idea is very simple you should end up going to bed hungry.

It is easy for us Americans to forget how many people in our own country go to bed hungry every night. They have no choice. On Ash Wednesday we go hungry by choice, as penance, a demonstration of our contrition and our hunger for God, our hunger for God's mercy.

Today many of us will eat in excess. It should remind us of all of the excesses in our lives. Today we look at how we have lived the last year, in particular the sin. We gather it all, and tomorrow we hand it all over to God. And we allow our bodies to feel hunger, that we might hunger more deeply for God.

Monday, February 27, 2017

Two days and counting

Today's fist reading from the Book of Sirach is the perfect prelude to Lent.

To the penitent God provides a way back, he encourages those who are losing hope and has chosen for them the lot of truth. Return to him and give up sin, pray to the LORD and make your offenses few.

In these last two days it is time for us to do a serious examination of conscience. We must look deep and acknowledge, not just the superficial sins, but the deeper more pervasive sins in our lives: prejudice, envy, an unwillingness to truly forgive, our judging of others. Often there are sins that are so deeply ingrained in us that we deny their existence or tell ourselves that these feelings are not sinful.

Sirach is realistic and knows that in this life none of us are going to live sin free, but we can all strive to "make [our] offenses few." Step one, however, is a willingness to call sin, sin. We must turn the light of truth on our own actions and our minds and most importantly our hearts.

With God there is always a way back, but in order to find our way back we must know where we are. We must acknowledge how far we have strayed. When we arrive in Church on Ash Wednesday, we should arrive with a true spirit of contrition. We should enter Lent with a concrete sense of our sins. Perhaps the four categories in the confiteor are helpful: thoughts, words, what I have done, what I have failed to do. God already knows our sins, but do we?

Sunday, February 26, 2017

Three days until Lent

With only three days until the beginning of Lent, today's gospel already invites us to shift our focus.

Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink, or about your body, what you will wear.

This is not a call for us ignore our earthy life or body, but a reminder that they cannot be ends unto themselves. The end, the goal should always the heavenly. What we do with our earthly life our earthly body will determine in large degree our eternal life, in heaven or hell.

So it makes sense that we begin Lent on Ash Wednesday with a day of fasting (required for those age 18-59) and abstaining from meat required for all over 14 years old. Recommended for others.

But before we get to Wednesday now is the time for us to decide how will be live the three penitential practices of Lent: giving alms, prayer, and fasting. What can we do throughout Lent as an acknowledgment of our sin and desire for true conversion of life.

Programs like Operation Rice Bowl are fine but there should also be a very personal component. Where do I waste money? Stop the behavior, save that money, and give it to the poor. A suggestion.

For prayer, perhaps for the days of Lent I will not pray for myself. All of my prayer will be for others, and not just my friends and family. A suggestion.

And as for fasting or giving up something. What can you not imagine doing without? That might be the perfect place to start.

Lent is about being uncomfortable, it is about moving beyond talk and doing penance. Don't choose something impossible but choose prayer, fasting, and almsgiving that will challenge you.







Saturday, February 25, 2017

Forever Young

Every day we see commercials for thousands of products that promise to keep us looking young and supplements that will keep our brains young. But what about our minds and hearts.

In today's gospel we read:

whoever does not accept the Kingdom of God like a child will not enter it.


Notice that it doesn't say "like an adolescent." The gospel is referring to a young child. And the wonderful thing about young children is that they are incessantly inquisitive but also open to learning. They are living sponges. They may drive you crazy with questions but it is merely an insatiable thirst for knowledge.

Somewhere around adolescence we change. The ego takes over and we decide that we know better. We question but it is no longer in order to learn but in order to assert control. It become about power. And I'm sure developmental psychology would tells us why this is a good thing — unless we get stuck here.

The thing I am loving about being in my 50's is realizing that the older I get the dumber I am. In my 20's and 30's I was smart. I knew everything. There was nothing I couldn't figure out and usually on my own. And I was more that willing to show you how much I knew.

In my 50's I realize how complicated the world is and how incredibly small my knowledge is. There are no simple answers. If there were, philosophy and theology would cease to exist.

As Christians, we must never forget that the word disciple means student. God created us to be perpetual students: forever seeking knowledge, forever seeking truth. To be disciples means that we must rid ourselves of any adolescent hubris that remains, and live always as inquisitive open hearted little children. Then we will enter the kingdom of God.

Friday, February 24, 2017

Our greatest challenge

Both today's first reading and the gospel focus on relationship. In the first reading from Sirach we hear about what makes a true and faithful friend, in the gospel we hear about the permanence of marriage. But if we are not careful we can overlook what may be for most of us the greatest challenge, when we hear in Sirach

A kind mouth multiplies friends and appeases enemies,and gracious lips prompt friendly greetings.

When we think of sin, all to often, we focus on the sensual one like lust or gluttony. In the process we can overlook what can be our greatest source of sin, our mouths. There is good reason when we pray the confiteor (I confess....) we as for forgive four categories of sin:

thoughts, words, what we have done, and what we have failed to do.

Sirach today presents it from the positive angle: a kind mouth and gracious lips. The scriptures remind us of what we are called to be, what we can be.

We may all have uncharitable thoughts, but we can choose not to give voice to them. Speaking your mind is no virtue if the mind is not one with the mind of Christ, if the mind is filled with uncharitable thoughts. And while legally speaking the truth may be a defense against slander, it is not a defense before God. If the truth you speak is gossip. If the truth you speak is intended to tear another person down. Speaking the truth can still be a sin.

Language is one of the greatest gifts God as given to humanity. Today's first reading reminds us to us it wisely. As we prepare to enter the season of Lent on Wednesday, perhaps it is time to ask the questions: do I have a kind mouth; do I have gracious lips? Those phrases only sound awkward because the ideas are so far removed from our culture.

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Receiving one child

In St. Mark today we hear the famous words of Jesus,


Whoever receives one child such as this in my name, receives me.

These words have always held a very special meaning for me. Many of you know that I am adopted. What many do not know it that I was 4 years and three months old before I was adopted. When I was adopted on November 3 1964 (my gotcha date), no one really understood the significance of having spent my first four years as a foster child.  It was not until my adoptive parents died 10 months part in 1998 and 1999, and I was thrown into the most painful experience of my life, that I came to understand the long term negative effects of being a foster child. I had read about the dark night of the soul, but as the 21st century began I was living it. And it would take several years, a good spiritual director and a good psychologist for me to truly understand and find that peace of God which is beyond all understanding.

Now I can wake up ever day of my life  with a smile because I know in the deepest recesses of my heart that I am never without family, I am never alone.  I can now see that, while I may never know who my biological mother and father are, God has blessed me with other mothers, fathers, brothers, and sisters,to paraphrase the scriptures, and my adorable baby sister. But I am one of the lucky few.

At any given moment there are over 400.000 children in the US in foster care, children who feel adrift in the world, without secure attachments, anchors. And for the children who simply "age out" of the system the statistics are horrendous. Many end up in on the street, in jail, or worse. In 2015 20,000 children simply aged out of the system.

In summer of 2013 I was asked to be a part of the statewide leadership team for Virginia Adopts. Our goal was to move 1000 children from foster families to forever families.  It was during these events that I realized that we former foster kids, whether we were adopted at 4 or 14, share a commonalities that it is difficult to express to others, and we who found our forever families must speak out for those who have not.

Virginia Adopts was an incredible success. Now Janet and Ryan Kelly with others have taken this mission to a whole new level with America's Kids Belong. And they will be the first to tell you that adopting a child who is not an infant is not easy. Yes, we come with baggage.  But nothing that cannot be healed with love and the grace of God, and the support services now available. Go to their website and check out what there are doing. Get involved on a local level.

Jesus tells us that whoever a receives a child such as this, receives him. My parents not only adopted me and two other children but served as foster parents for dozens of others. They were good foster parents. But there is something about the bond of adoption that changes a child's life forever. I know the security that came when I went from Wayne Patterson (the name given me by the Department of Social Services) to Wayne Lee Ball the son of John and Marcia Ball.  Today I pray for every one of my more that 400,000 brothers and sisters in foster care. And I pray for those who are contemplating adoption and those who should be contemplating adoption. These children are waiting. They are waiting to be received by you or someone you know.

Saturday, February 11, 2017

Finding Healing

Divine Providence: When I was a seminarian, I did several talks around the country about Ministry with People with Disabilities. An all too generous person who heard me speak at one of these conferences paid for me to go on pilgrimage to the Shrine in France. What neither of us could know was that my first pariah assignment would also be to Our Lady of Lourdes in Richmond Virginia. Since then, this memorial has continued to hold a very special place in my life.

In the intervening 28 years I have learned an important lesson, something that I did not know when I travelled there. Perhaps the healing you need is not the one you think. We tend to focus on the physical, the visible. Often the deepest wounds are the invisible ones, the ones only God can see, the ones that we struggles to hide from others and even hide from ourselves.

There is probably no greater stigma in our society that the one associated with mental illness. It seems to be the only thing we won't talk about in public. And every day in this country that stigma has tragic consequences. Lives are cut short, and parents suffer their worst nightmare. Thankfully there are some organizations like The Cameron Gallagher K. Foundation, but not nearly enough and mental health services remain woefully inadequate.

Today let us turn to Our Lady and pray from healing: not just the healing of bodies, minds, and souls, but also a healing of society, of attitudes. Let us pray for every individual and every family suffering in silence. May the silence and the suffering be healed.

Friday, February 10, 2017

Redemptive Pain

It has been almost a year since the constant hip then lower back pain began. At first I thought it was simply the usual random issues that those of us with Cerebral Palsy deal with.  For months I did the usual things but none of them helped. I finally went to the doctor and in short it has turned out to be arthritis in my lower spine. Not much you can do about that.

Over the course of these months I have also been doing a bit of wrestling with God:the common, all to human: "Why me?" "Haven't I had enough to deal with in my life?"

I share this because what has come to me in prayer is a very simple truth:


Chronic pain forces us out of ourselves.  


If we direct our focus inward, the way much Pop spirituality would have us do, then all the  brain is going to find is the pain. And if we do that for very long we can get lost in the suffering and emptiness.   But if we turn our focus outward, away from ourselves then we simply cannot think about the pain.  The human mind cannot focus on two things simultaneously. We can switch our focus back and forth between objects but we cannot focus on two things at once.

Jesus taught us by word and example to always be focused on others.  Even at the moment of his crucifixion, he was focused on the thieves crucified with him, he was focused on his mother and the beloved disciple.

We live in a culture that sets the "self" as the highest good. But if we are Christians we are always looking outward and upward. We kneel in our Catholic Church's and we look to the tabernacle and Christ present in the Eucharist. We kneel at the foot of the cross. We know "it is truly right and just, our duty and our salvation, aways and everywhere to give you thanks, Lord"

I have always loved Philippians 4:11 "For I have learned to be content in whatever circumstance." But God continues to show me new levels to what this simple phrase means.

All of us have selfishness and all us of experience pain in life. If we allow it, the latter can become the cure for the former, when touched by God's grace.